Can someone help me complete this Verilog code for this sequential circuit

cadcode-designflipflopstate-machinesverilog

I'm still pretty new to Verilog and all and could use some help completing/fixing my code for this problem. I have made the state diagram, state table/assignment, minimized the equation, and even have some of the Verilog done, but I'm just not too good at understanding Verilog.

Here's the prompt:

Derive a sequential circuit with one input (w) and one output (z)
using D flip flops that detects an input sequence of 101. Use a Moore
model, and show all of your work including the state machine, state
table, state assignment, state assignment table, and the final
circuit.

PS, I also don't know how to fully draw the circuit. But other than that, here's the progress I've made:

(I don't have a high enough rep to embed images if someone can do that for me, thanks)

State Diagram:

enter image description here

State Table, Assignment, and Minimal equation

enter image description here

Besides the circuit diagram, I have the first part done. Now I have to implement this as a Verilog program.. even though I'm not quite sure where I'm going with it. I've looked at some examples and this is what I've got so far:

Verilog code so far

module my_circ(Clock, Resetn, w, z);

    input Clock, Resetn, w;
    output z;
    reg [3:1] y2, y1, Y2, Y1 //not sure about this line.. probably throws the rest off
    parameter [3:1] A = 2'b00, B = 2'b01, C = 2'b10, D = 2'b11;

    always @(w,y2,y1)
        case (y2)
            A: if (w)  Y2 = 0;
                       Y1 = 1;
               else    Y2 = 0;
                       Y1 = 0;
            B: if (w)  Y2 = 0;
                       Y1 = 1;

    /////////// I don't think this is right at all :(
            default:    Y1 = ...

    always @(negedge Resetn, posedge Clock)
        if (Resetn == 0) //something :/
        else //something else :/

    assign z = (...); //something :/

endmodule

After trying to write that Verilog, I realize I'm just about clueless when it comes to implementing this 🙁 I tried following different examples but all of the ones I can find use 3 states instead of 4 like this one. I think I should have multiple cases? And ugh idk where to set which variables and what to set them to.

Any advice will help me. Thanks.

Best Answer

Actually, the structure of your verilog looks just fine. It's the details that are wrong, in a lot of places. Here are some:

reg [3:1] y2, y1, Y2, Y1

Yes, the missing semicolon throws the compiler off. More to the point, [3:1] tells it that each of these regs is three bits wide, but they're only one bit wide in the planning. Traditionally we use 0 for the least significant bit (such that the binary interpretation has weight 2^n at bit n). The parameter line would thus be [1:0], as it is you extend it to three bits wide.

always @(w,y2,y1)
always @(negedge Resetn, posedge Clock)

The sensitivity list is separated by or, not comma.

    case (y2)
        A: if (w)  Y2 = 0;
                   Y1 = 1;
           else    Y2 = 0;
                   Y1 = 0;

y2 in this case statement only matches one bit in your planning (three in the code, but that made less sense). You can concatenate bits using {y2,y1}; in fact, extending the case to case ({y2,y1,w}) will let you use case matches like {A,1'b0}: and remove the if statements entirely.

Secondly, you are trying to manage groups of statements (both assignments to Y2 and Y1) with if; doing so requires enclosing them with begin and end. Alternatively, you could make a wider assignment such as {Y2,Y1} <= B;, which ends up more readable as it can use your named states.

Thirdly, assignment using = can cause some confusion (it acts more like sequential languages, while <= doesn't modify the meaning of a reg within your always). In this case, it is fine as the block is fully combinatorial and does not depend on its own outputs.

Finally (for the case section), you can simply add more matches. You don't even need a default match, but it's probably convenient to use default to go to state A in this case.

always @(negedge Resetn, posedge Clock)
    if (Resetn == 0) //something :/
    else //something else :/

Something and something else would be register updates, such as {y2,y1} <= {Y2,Y1};. It is the clock edge sensitivity that turns the regs into flipflops.

Finally, since you should now understand what defines a reg width, why don't you make two bit wide regs named state and next_state to replace {y2,y1} and {Y2,Y1} respectively?